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Investing in rental property can be highly rewarding if successful, as it can help build your net worth and make a profit by generating a steady monthly income. This type of investment takes work, however, with landlords having to worry not only about finding the right property but also about maintaining it, making it attractive for potential tenants and finding suitable and trustworthy renters.

All experienced landlords have their share of tenant horror stories, ranging from dealing with unruly renters to facing significant property damage, but with a proper screening process in place, most problems can be avoided. Establishing a professional, positive relationship between landlord and tenant can help the former obtain a solid return on investment and the latter achieve a higher quality of life. Below, 10 real estate experts with Forbes Real Estate Council share some of the most important things any landlord should remember to improve their tenant relations.

1. Over-Communication

Keeping good lines of communication open can solve many landlord/tenant problems. Make sure tenants understand why things are happening, and give good advance notice for anything disruptive. – Jeremy Brandt, WeBuyHouses.com

2. Tenants Are People, Too

The opportunity to serve others comes with a variety of faces. As a landlord, the ability to engage with tenants as stakeholders brings conscious leadership to our everyday interactions. Home is where the heart is, and supporting people as they create a home is a gift. Realizing you are part of impacting the social/emotional environment for others, brings a humanitarian vibe to a traditional role. – Susan Leger Ferraro, Peace, Love, Happiness Real Estate

3. Boundaries And Limitations

As our investment platform scaled nationally, we noted the variation of landlord-tenant laws as some geographic regions favored landlords disproportionately. We found it essential to understand the legislative dynamics of the community by partnering with local experts to mitigate our liability and legal exposure. – André Bueno, The BM Group

4. Being Approachable

Many tenants are afraid to contact their landlord about issues. From landlords, I hear that tenants don’t tell them about repairs until they are really bad. From tenants, I hear they don’t want to call because they don’t want to bother the landlord or are afraid. Be approachable. Be supportive of you tenants. One way we can help landlords have better tenants is teach tenants about maintenance. – Michelle Ames, HorsePower Realty/Realty Executives Metroplex

5. Trust Is The Key To A Better Relationship

My company was born from my own awful renting experience when I was pitted against other potential tenants in a bidding war. Even worse than the high monthly rent, I ended up with was the poor relationship with the landlord that ensued. Renters who have a poor experience leasing their home are more likely to churn from their lease. Landlords should make sure they build trust in the leasing phase. – Anthemos Georgiades, Zumper

6. Better Protocol

The majority of horror stories typically boil down to one thing: horrible tenants, right? However, it is incumbent upon the landlord or property manager to have a proper, thorough and strictly held vetting process for which to qualify the people who will be occupying your investment. If you’re allowing just anyone, the nightmare began before the lease even started; you just didn’t realize it yet. – Tracy Royce, Royce of Real Estate

7. The Little Things

I’ve come to the conclusion that succeeding in real estate comes down to doing the little things on a consistent basis. The same thing goes for being a landlord. Little things such as a move-in package and holiday gift cards for tenants, responding quickly to maintenance requests and being pleasant can be the difference between a tenant that will want to stay and pay and one that won’t. – Engelo Rumora, List’n Sell Realty

8. Careful Lease Review Before Signing

Many people sign documents without thoroughly reading them. Although it is not your job to hold your tenant’s hand through committing to the terms you have laid out, if you take the time, in the beginning, to make sure they understand and are willing to comply with all the terms, there will be fewer surprises later on and less chance of conflict. – Hillary Hobson, Highest Cash Offer

9. Tenants Are Clients

Every landlord should remind themselves that tenants are their clients. They’re also trusting those clients with a very valuable asset. It’s best to be respectful, communicate openly and professionally and take care of tenants so they take care of the rental property. A landlord’s behavior influences the tenants’ behavior. – Dave Zirnhelt, Snap Up Real Estate

Forbes Real Estate Council is an invitation-only community for executives in the real estate industry. Do I qualify?

10. Having A Property Manager

I own a property management company that collects rent, handles tenant requests/repairs, takes care of everything from A-Z. Take the stress off your shoulders as the landlord and let a professional handle the “dirty” work for you. Let us be the “bad” guy, while you vacation in the Bahamas with friends. The less you interact with your tenant, the better your relationship will be with them. – Angela Yaun, Day Realty Group

Source: forbes.com

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  • Sandi

    The less you interact with your tenant, the better your relationship will be with them. – Angela Yaun, Day Realty Group

    I don’t think I agree with the above statement. I have always tried to interact with my Tenants and usually they love me until they move out and realize they will not be receiving their entire Security Deposit back!!! Then some of them don’t “love” me as much as they did before!!!!

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