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landlord helpA landlord in Springfield, Massachusetts has agreed to pay $6,000 to settle EPA claims that tenants in a 99-unit building were not provided with information concerning lead paint.

According to EPAs New England office, the owners of the apartment building failed to disclose information about lead-based paint prior to leasing 10 apartments in the building.

Specifically, they failed to provide a copy of EPAs lead hazard information pamphlet, Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home, to the tenants and failed to include a lead warning statement in the lease.

According to EPA, the landlord also failed to include, as an attachment or within the lease, a list of records or reports regarding lead-based paint or lead-based paint hazards, or to indicate that no such list exists.

This action stems from a 2008 inspection of the property by EPA.

The Lead Disclosure Rule is meant to give tenants adequate information about the risks associated with lead paint so that they can make informed decisions before signing a lease agreement.

Federal law requires that property owners, property managers and real estate agents leasing or selling housing built before 1978 provide the following information to tenants and buyers: the EPA-approved lead hazard information pamphlet, Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home; a lead warning statement; statements disclosing any known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards; and copies of all available records or reports regarding lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards.

This information must be provided to tenants and buyers before they enter into leases or purchase and sales agreements. Property owners, property managers and real estate agents equally share responsibility for providing lead disclosure information and must retain copies of records regarding lead disclosures for three years.

With AAOA, landlords have resources at their fingertips. Check out our Landlord Forms page. American Apartment Owners Association offers discounts on products and services for landlords related to your rental housing investment, including rental forms, tenant debt collection, tenant background checks, insurance and financing. Find out more at www.joinaaoa.org.

  • GARY

    Can there possibly be anyone out there who doesn’t know that lead based paint is not suitable for ingesting or breathing of the dust? What do they do when there is no lead? Do they eat the “safe” paint? Do they grind it up without a mask and breath it in?
    Welcome to Safety for Morons 101 where your landlord should warn about all the things to keep you in the gene pool. Also included, of course, is the Radon Gas Caution. For advanced students, we need to include Drive Safely, Don’t Eat Unhealthy Foods, Don’t Look Down the Barrel of Your Gun to See if it’s Loaded, Watch Both Ways When Crossing the Street, and by all means, keep voting Democrat to gain even more valuable information of this sort.

  • Rock Stahla

    You are so right. Big government thrives on dumbing down the masses. Even if they recieve the lead based paint form and sign it. It changes nothing. People still rent or buy the house. It is just more stupid paperwork. Like the sign says “if you voted for BHO in 2008 to prove you were not a racist, you better vote for someone else to prove you are not an idiot!”

  • It’s federal law, period. Realtors should know this law without exception. If the age of the building is unknown it is best to provide the lead base paint disclosures and pamphlets for compliance security. The $6,000 fine is cheap if you consider what a wrongful death suit might cost. The article didn’t mention if a realtor was invloved, I think not, surely his or her name and brokeage would have been plastered all over the page. The article helps to keep me on my toes.

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