Open/Close Menu
Your Rental Housing Solution
Home · Property Management · Landlord Quick Tips : Landlord Quick Tip

Tip #224: Keeping It Together

If you rent to a married couple, it’s probably a good thing.

But, not always.

If your married tenants were to split and go their separate ways, you may find yourself with one of them expecting to stay in your unit.  The other is likely off somewhere, renting another property.

Now all of a sudden you have a conundrum.  What if they aren’t both tenants on the lease? What if you don’t have any information on the remaining spouse because the other one rented the unit?

So, what to do?

First of all, be sure that both parties fill out a rental application, and both of them sign the lease. You want both of them to be responsible for paying the rent.

You need to protect your legal rights. The remaining party may — or may not– have the ability to pay the rent.  If one of the co-tenants leaves, the lease may be broken. It may be time to review the rental relationship between all parties to the lease and determine the best path forward.

See last week’s Landlord Quick Tip.

American Apartment Owners Association offers discounts on products and services for landlords related to your rental housing investment, including rental forms, tenant debt collection, tenant background checks, insurance and financing. Find out more at www.joinaaoa.org.

 

 

  • GARY CARLSON

    Hmmm. If/When it comes time for eviction, perhaps having only one person should be on the lease? That way, it would seem to be to the landlord’s advantage to deal with only one entity?

    Similar thinking applies to dealing with bankruptcy. For example, if both husband and wife are on the deed, then either can file for bankruptcy. After a year of dealing with that, then the other takes over and files.

    Definitely some thinking to do with the attorney.

Copyright © 2004 - 2016 AAOA.com. All Rights Reserved.