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Home · Property Management · Financing : Create Monthly Cash Flow Without Any of Your Own Money or Credit

by Bill Bronchick

landlord helpA profitable, yet easy-to-learn method of creating cash flow is to buy and re-sell properties in back-to-back closings. However, flipping properties in this manner requires you to KEEP WORKING. When you stop working, the cash flow stops coming in.

Rather than flip properties for all cash, flip them for some cash and a promissory note that pays you monthly income with interest for years and years.

The “Wraparound” Transaction

Obviously, you need the cash to buy the property. Most people buy properties using a mortgage loan, which means you need enough cash flow from the sale of the property to pay off the loan you borrowed.

Enter the wraparound formula. A “wrap” is a transaction that involves leaving the first mortgage in place and creating a new loan to a buyer which is secondary to the first mortgage. The payments come in from the buyer, and you make the payments on the underlying loan still in place. There is a “spread” between the two payments which equals cash flow to you. Most agents equate a ?nothing down? offer with a buyer who is not serious.

Example: Buy a property worth $100,000 for a discounted price of $90,000. Put 20% down ($18,000) and finance the balance of $72,000 at 9% with a conventional loan. Your principal and interest (“P&I”) payment is about $580.00 per month. Resell the property for $110,000, taking a down payment of $15,000 and a $95,000 note at 12% interest. You collect about $977 per month. Your cash flow is almost $400 per month ($4800/year), with just $10,000 invested (figuring $5000 in closing costs.) That’s 48% annual interest on your money!.

This deal is definitely “cookie cutter” and easy to do, but I said “no money or credit.” Here’s the solution: find a partner to put up their money and credit.

Step 1: Locate an open-minded investor who has good credit and provable income.

Step 2: Form a limited liability company (“LLC”) of which you are both the members, 50/50.

Step 3: Locate properties in nice middle class neighborhoods available for 10% or more below market.

Step 4: Execute a resolution from the LLC that your investor member will purchase a particular property in is name, for the benefit of the LLC. Have the investor purchase the property in his name, using his credit and down payment.

Step 5: Advertise the property for sale by owner “no credit required.” Find a buyer willing to pay at least 10% more than the appraised value of the property with 10% or more as a down payment. The investor gets the cash to recoup his investment

Step 6: Execute a land contract to the new buyer.

Step 7: Collect monthly cash flow and split it with the investor.

In the above example, you so all the legwork and you split the cash flow with the investor. When the investor is unable to obtain any more loans, find another investor, rinse and repeat.

William Bronchick, CEO of Legalwiz Publications, is a Nationally-known attorney, author, entrepreneur and speaker. Mr. Bronchick has been practicing law and real estate since 1990, having been involved in over 600 transactions. He has appeared as a guest on numerous radio and television talk shows including CNBC Power Lunch. He has been featured in Who’s Who in American Business, Money Magazine, the Los Angeles Times and the Denver Business Journal. William Bronchick has served as President of the Colorado Association of Real Estate Investors since 1996.

Copyright 2002-2010 All Rights Reserved.  Published with Permission of Author.  This article is provided courtesy of the REIClub, a club for people with an interest in Real Estate Investing.  No part of this publication may be copied or reprinted without the express written permission of the Author andREIClub.com.

See Bill Bronchick’s feature, 7 Reasons to Use a Land Trust.

American Apartment Owners Association offers discounts on products and services for landlords related to your rental housing investment, including rental forms, tenant debt collection, tenant background checks, insurance and financing. Find out more at www.joinaaoa.org.

  • Michael Cooper

    Yes, that is a good plan, but there’s one possible glitch…..typically all mortgages have a Due On Sale Clause, and if the the bank finds out you are doing a wrap, they have the right to Call The Loan…. Oh, Oh, trouble!!

    OK, why would a bank call a loan if it’s being kept current? Banks are doing all kinds of off-the-wall things now. So there’s no guarantee they won’t step in & call the loan.

    Also, the new buyer only makes the mortgage payment to YOU, not the bank, this way you know if the payment is being made. Make sure you account for the interest the new buyer is paying you. MTC

  • James Burson

    The wrap around transaction in your article seems fine except for two things. How do you get around the due on sale clause in most mortgage loans. Furthermore, the person who bought the home for the LLC could have some legal propblems because of the owner occupany requirements of the loan (at least for a short period of time) unless the loan is made on an “investment” property.

    The borower could be facing jail time and risk haveing the loan acclerated if the lender finds out the property has been sold.

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